Saturday, April 15, 2006

"Suppressing the N.O. Vote"

The Editors at The Nation write:

New Orleans has long been pivotal in the struggle for black voting rights. During the Civil War, free blacks there demanded suffrage; their efforts resulted in Lincoln's first public call for voting rights for some blacks in the final speech of his life. Once these rights were won, New Orleans blacks took an active part in politics, leading to the establishment of the South's only integrated public school system. But rights once gained aren't necessarily secure; after Reconstruction, blacks in New Orleans lost the right to vote. As Thomas Wentworth Higginson wrote at the time of the Civil War, "revolutions may go backwards."

This is what we are seeing now, as New Orleans prepares for municipal elections on April 22. These elections are set to take place even though fewer than half the city's 460,000 residents have returned and the vast majority of those displaced outside Louisiana are African-Americans--the result of what Representative Barney Frank calls the Bush Administration's policy of "ethnic cleansing by inaction."

How did this happen? How did New Orleans become the most obvious symbol of the "backwards revolution" in voting rights that's been going on for at least twenty-five years? read more

1 Comments:

At 1:26 PM, Blogger Tom Sawyer said...

I don't mean to be tiresome, but my city recently held elections without assistance from the Federal Government. What happens in New Orleans is ultimately the responsibility of the citizens of New Orleans and Louisiana. If the same storm wiped out Palm Springs or some other white, Republican stronghold it would have been old news three days after the storm. This story and others like it are conspiracy theories at their very worst. From what I was able to see on the news during Katrina, Ray Nagin losing his job is about the best thing that could happen to New Orleans. Last, if this were happening in ANY state north of the Mason-Dixon line it would be a non-story. The Voting Rights Act only applies to southern states. If Lake Michigan ever overflows its banks, Chicago will be spared this sort of malicious scrutiny.

 

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