Monday, March 27, 2006

Who Is Killing New Orleans?

Mike Davis in The Nation

"More than 60 percent of Nagin's constituents--including an estimated 80 percent of the African-Americans--are still scattered in exile with no obvious way home.

In their absence, local business elites, advised by conservative think tanks, "New Urbanists" and neo-Democrats, have usurped almost every function of elected government. With the City Council largely shut out of their deliberations, mayor-appointed commissions and outside experts, mostly white and Republican, propose to radically shrink and reshape a majority-black and Democratic city. Without any mandate from local voters, the public-school system has already been virtually abolished, along with the jobs of unionized teachers and school employees. Thousands of other unionized jobs have been lost with the closure of Charity Hospital, formerly the flagship of public medicine in Louisiana. And a proposed oversight board, dominated by appointees of President Bush and Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, would end local control over city finances. [...]

With each passing week of neglect--what Representative Barney Frank has labeled "a policy of ethnic cleansing by inaction"--the likelihood increases that most black Orleanians will never be able to return. read more

3 Comments:

At 1:48 AM, Anonymous Jim said...

Thanks so much for linking to this article.

All of what Davis describes was utterly predictable. One of my first thoughts after Katrina hit New Orleans was that,

so long as those who left the city cannot come back, the Republicans are guaranteed another seat in the U.S. Senate.

Mary Landrieu, the Democratic Senator from Louisiana, won her seat by a much smaller margin than 200,000, the

number of black people who have yet to return to New Orleans. You can be sure that this, and similar political

considerations, are the Bush administration's sole interest in the event (besides the no-bid contracts, of course).

Despite the best efforts of ACORN, the sole bright spot in Mike Davis's piece, I doubt New Orleans will be anything

like it was. As everyone knows, New Orleans was unique in its feeling, social organization, traditions, and culture.

Much of that is probably gone forever. For it to be otherwise, a huge number of people would have to organize, and

that is not likely to happen. I would welcome being surprised about this.

So, in the absence of any alternative, there is a bright side.

1. The poor and working class people who have left New Orleans, while having lost something priceless, have no doubt

enrolled their kids in schools that are far better than the ones they left. Some of those kids will flourish in a way that

they never could have growing up in New Orleans. A friend of mine, who has become the de facto father to one of his

neighbor's sons and has enrolled him in a school in Lake Charles, saw the change immediately. The boy just

blossomed. New Orleans was a city of no hope. For some, there will now be hope.

2. Mary Landrieu is at least as Republican as Democrat. She has often sided in the Senate with Bush against her own

party. I have been her waiter in New Orleans restaurants on several occasions, and I could intuit her power hunger

and self-centeredness instantly. (No, I don't remember if she undertipped.) Her loss would be of little consequence.

3. Finally, I do not believe that there is any question that global warming is going to get much worse. New Orleans

(and much of south Louisiana) will be gone in a hundred years, perhaps much sooner. The federal government's

unwillingness to spend any money making the levees hurricane-proof will only make the city's disappearance happen

earlier. No family that moves back to New Orleans will be back for very long. Perhaps the next hurricane to hit the

city can single out rich Republicans.

 
At 1:53 AM, Anonymous Jim said...

(This is the same as my other comment. I did not realize that pasting text into the comment form from another program would cause the additional line breaks. They ruin the readibility of the comment. Sorry.)

Thanks so much for linking to this article.

All of what Davis describes was utterly predictable. One of my first thoughts after Katrina hit New Orleans was that, so long as those who left the city cannot come back, the Republicans are guaranteed another seat in the U.S. Senate. Mary Landrieu, the Democratic Senator from Louisiana, won her seat by a much smaller margin than 200,000, the number of black people who have yet to return to New Orleans. You can be sure that this, and similar political considerations, are the Bush administration's sole interest in the event (besides the no-bid contracts, of course).

Despite the best efforts of ACORN, the sole bright spot in Mike Davis's piece, I doubt New Orleans will be anything like it was. As everyone knows, New Orleans was unique in its feeling, social organization, traditions, and culture.

Much of that is probably gone forever. For it to be otherwise, a huge number of people would have to organize, and that is not likely to happen. I would welcome being surprised about this.

So, in the absence of any alternative, there is a bright side.

1. The poor and working class people who have left New Orleans, while having lost something priceless, have no doubt enrolled their kids in schools that are far better than the ones they left. Some of those kids will flourish in a way that they never could have growing up in New Orleans. A friend of mine, who has become the de facto father to one of his neighbor's sons and has enrolled him in a school in Lake Charles, saw the change immediately. The boy just blossomed. New Orleans was a city of no hope. For some, there will now be hope.

2. Mary Landrieu is at least as Republican as Democrat. She has often sided in the Senate with Bush against her own party. I have been her waiter in New Orleans restaurants on several occasions, and I could intuit her power hunger and self-centeredness instantly. (No, I don't remember if she undertipped.) Her loss would be of little consequence.

3. Finally, I do not believe that there is any question that global warming is going to get much worse. New Orleans (and much of south Louisiana) will be gone in a hundred years, perhaps much sooner. The federal government's unwillingness to spend any money making the levees hurricane-proof will only make the city's disappearance happen earlier. No family that moves back to New Orleans will be back for very long. Perhaps the next hurricane to hit the city can single out rich Republicans.

--Jim

 
At 3:45 AM, Blogger sexy said...

情趣用品,情趣用品,情趣用品,情趣用品,情趣用品,情趣用品,情趣,情趣,情趣,情趣,情趣,情趣,情趣用品,情趣用品,情趣,情趣,A片,A片,情色,A片,A片,情色,A片,A片,情趣用品,A片,情趣用品,A片,情趣用品,a片,情趣用品

A片,A片,AV女優,色情,成人,做愛,情色,AIO,視訊聊天室,SEX,聊天室,自拍,AV,情色,成人,情色,aio,sex,成人,情色

免費A片,美女視訊,情色交友,免費AV,色情網站,辣妹視訊,美女交友,色情影片,成人影片,成人網站,H漫,18成人,成人圖片,成人漫畫,情色網,日本A片,免費A片下載,性愛

情色文學,色情A片,A片下載,色情遊戲,色情影片,色情聊天室,情色電影,免費視訊,免費視訊聊天,免費視訊聊天室,一葉情貼圖片區,情色視訊,免費成人影片,視訊交友,視訊聊天,言情小說,愛情小說,AV片,A漫,AVDVD,情色論壇,視訊美女,AV成人網,成人交友,成人電影,成人貼圖,成人小說,成人文章,成人圖片區,成人遊戲,愛情公寓,情色貼圖,色情小說,情色小說,成人論壇

情色貼圖,色情聊天室,情色視訊,情色文學,色情小說,情色小說,色情,寄情築園小遊戲,情色電影,色情遊戲,色情網站,聊天室,ut聊天室,豆豆聊天室,美女視訊,辣妹視訊,視訊聊天室,視訊交友網,免費視訊聊天,免費A片,日本a片

A片,A片,A片下載,做愛,成人電影,.18成人,日本A片,情色小說,情色電影,成人影城,自拍,情色論壇,成人論壇,情色貼圖,情色,免費A片,成人,成人網站,成人圖片,AV女優,成人光碟,色情,色情影片,免費A片下載,SEX,AV,色情網站,本土自拍,性愛,成人影片,情色文學,成人文章,成人圖片區,成人貼圖

 

Post a Comment

<< Home